Tag Archives: Caryl Churchill

a profoundly affectionate, passionate devotion to someone (-noun)

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Upstairs, London (****)

© Stephen Cummiskey, Gershwyn Eustache Jrn (B), Lashana Lynch (A)

© Stephen Cummiskey, Gershwyn Eustache Jrn (B), Lashana Lynch (A)

Seeing Caryl Churchill in the audience this week for debbie tucker green’s latest is to be reminded of the enormous influence and legacy Churchill has bequeathed, is bequeathing to British theatre. Continue reading

Blue Heart

Orange Tree, Richmond, London (****)

© Richard Davenport for The Other Richard, Alex Beckett, Amelda Brown and Amanda Boxer Heart's Desire

© Richard Davenport for The Other Richard, Alex Beckett, Amelda Brown and Amanda Boxer Heart’s Desire

Comprising Heart’s Desire & Blue Kettle

This revival of Caryl Churchill’s 1997 Royal Court original is another grand example of the astuteness of Paul Miller. A co-production this time with Bristol’s acclaimed Tobacco Factory Theatre, such collaborations have allowed him to take many more risks than would probably have been the case going it alone. Continue reading

Pigs and Dogs

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Downstairs (***/1/2)

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

They’re getting shorter and shorter, in fact Caryl Churchill’s Pigs & Dogs runs just 15 minutes, even more condensed than her controversial Seven Jewish Children. Continue reading

A View from Islington North

Arts Theatre, London (***)

© Robert Workman, Ann Mitchell (Ayn Rand), Steve John Shepherd (Gideon/George)

© Robert Workman, Ann Mitchell (Ayn Rand), Steve John Shepherd (Gideon/George) in David Hare’s Ayn Rand Takes a Stand

This is a strange evening. Styled an evening of political satire, it turns out to be an under-whelming evening save for one major exception. Continue reading

In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises)

Gate Notting Hill, London (****)

© Bill Knight with Alex Waldmann as Man, Adelle Leonce as Woman

© Bill Knight with Alex Waldmann as Man, Adelle Leonce as Woman

 

Like David Lindsay-Abaire’s Rabbit Hole at Hamsptead Theatre, Nina Segal’s In the Night Time initially offers us a domestic scenario: a couple and a child. Continue reading

Light Shining in Buckinghamshire

Lyttelton, National Theatre

© Marc Brenner

© Marc Brenner

In the week before the most unpredictable General Election in a generation, Caryl Churchill’s humane, enlightened Light Shining in Buckinghamshire comes like a welcome blast from the past. Featuring events, impacts and debates surrounding the English Civil War, it couldn’t be more apt even if, born as it was in the heady theatrical turbulence of the 1970s when like its political predecessor 300 years earlier, rebellion, the collective will and processes were all up for grabs, it’s dramatic design does seem now from another age. Continue reading