Tag Archives: David Hare

A View from Islington North

Arts Theatre, London (***)

© Robert Workman, Ann Mitchell (Ayn Rand), Steve John Shepherd (Gideon/George)

© Robert Workman, Ann Mitchell (Ayn Rand), Steve John Shepherd (Gideon/George) in David Hare’s Ayn Rand Takes a Stand

This is a strange evening. Styled an evening of political satire, it turns out to be an under-whelming evening save for one major exception. Continue reading

The Master Builder

The Old Vic, London (****)

© Manuel Harlan. Sarah Snook (Hilde Wangel) and Ralph Fiennes (Halvard Solness) in The Master Builder, Old Vic, Feb 2016

© Manuel Harlan.
Sarah Snook (Hilde Wangel) and Ralph Fiennes (Halvard Solness) in The Master Builder, Old Vic, Feb 2016

Before seeing this latest revival of Ibsen’s remarkable examination of age, desire, and the sub-conscious, I worried that Ralph Fiennes’s Halvard Solness, the self-taught and `lucky’ master builder might dwarf the rest of the cast and the production. Would the Hilde Wangel be able to hold her own against him? Continue reading

The Moderate Soprano

Hampstead Theatre, London (***)

© Manuel Harlan

© Manuel Harlan

Almost a year to the day since Roger Allam last appeared at Hampstead theatre in Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar, he’s returned in David Hare’s latest, a biographical portrait of the founders of Glyndebourne that suits him to a tee. Continue reading

Young Chekhov (the Birth of a Genius)

Chichester Festival Theatres (**** overall, *** The Seagull)

© Johan Persson

© Johan Persson

How do you like your Chekhov? Do you even like Chekhov? Is he sacrosanct or ripe for parody and rehashing? Lord knows he’s been taken apart over the years, re-constructed (famously the American avant garde Wooster Group with Brace Up!, their deconstructed version of Chekhov’s Three Sisters) and put back together again. Like Shakespeare, debates rage around his texts, none more so than the early play of Platonov (pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable apparently) and Ivanov, the latter his first full length play and typically not a success on its first showing. Continue reading

Behind the Beautiful Forevers

Olivier Theatre, National Theatre, London

Behind the Beautiful Forevers

© Richard Hubert-Smith

There’s something deeply disturbing about sitting in a comfortable western theatre bearing witness to the dire poverty lived elsewhere in the world. That, of course, is the power of theatre and it’s a testament to Rufus Norris’ blazing production, the assiduity of journalist Katherine Boo’s dedication in the slums of Mumbai and David Hare’s smooth adaptation that it has such a conscience pricking effect.

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