Tag Archives: Dominic Cooke

Pigs and Dogs

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Downstairs (***/1/2)

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

They’re getting shorter and shorter, in fact Caryl Churchill’s Pigs & Dogs runs just 15 minutes, even more condensed than her controversial Seven Jewish Children. Continue reading

Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom

Lyttelton, National Theatre, London (****)

© Johan Persson. Sharon D Clarke as Ma Rainey

© Johan Persson. Sharon D Clarke as Ma Rainey

There’s a kind of irony in the National’s directorial choice for August Wilson’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. The story of a recording by the `mother’ of the Blues and the struggle for black musicians to control their own music-making, it was the Broadway hit that catapulted Wilson into the limelight in 1984 and the first in its author’s decalogy tracing the history of African-Americans in the 20th century. Continue reading

Teddy Ferrara

Donmar Warehouse, London (****)

© Manuel Harlan

© Manuel Harlan

Christopher Shinn always makes one think. The obvious is never quite it with the American playwright who has had five plays premiered in London, all at the Royal Court including Now or Later (2008) directed by this production’s director, Dominic Cooke whilst artistic director. Continue reading

Now or Later

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Downstairs, London

Whilst other matters have recently overtaken the race to be the next President of the United States, the election proper in November still awaits us. In the interim, we can enjoy Christopher Shinn’s new play, set on the night of a fictional Presidential election. Continue reading

Seven Jewish Children

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Downstairs, London

Yes, you read it right. 10 minutes, the length of Caryl Churchill’s `response’ to Gaza. Back in the 1970s and 1980s, `quick response’ could be applied as much to the Arts as to the emergency services. Now a quick theatrical response is rare. It evidently takes something traumatic to fire the imagination of artists and writers these days. Gaza has clearly been one of them.

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