Tag Archives: Donmar Warehouse

The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui

Donmar Warehouse, London (****)

© Helen Maybanks, Lenny Henry as Arturo Ui

© Helen Maybanks, Lenny Henry as Arturo Ui

Well, to start at the end, I can’t remember a more personally `engaged’ ending than Simon Evans manufactures for the climax of Brecht’s 1940s political satire on the rise of Hitler in an American gangland setting. Continue reading

Limehouse

Donmar Warehouse, London (****)

© Jack Sain, the Gang of Four - Bill Rodgers (Paul Chahidi), Roy Jenkins (Roger Allam), Shirley Williams (Debra Gillet), David Owen (Tom Goodman-Hill)

© Jack Sain, the Gang of Four – Bill Rodgers (Paul Chahidi), Roy Jenkins (Roger Allam), Shirley Williams (Debra Gillet), David Owen (Tom Goodman-Hill)

Spoiler for Marxists and Trots! You won’t like this apologia for those `traitors’ behind the setting up of the SDP, the Gang of Four. Continue reading

The Tempest

Donmar Warehouse at King’s Cross, London (****)

© Helen Maybanks, Harriet Walter as Prospero

© Helen Maybanks, Harriet Walter as Prospero

It’s hard to over-estimate the impact of Phyllida Lloyd’s Shakespeare Trilogy in its environmentally immersive aluminium shed by King’s Cross. As the programme notes eloquently point out, because of the place Shakespeare holds in our culture, we’ve been lulled into a false perspective of our society, given the disparity in the overall number of roles for women the plays reflect. Continue reading

One Night in Miami…

Donmar Warehouse, London (****)

© Johann Persson, Sope Dirisu (Cassius Clay), David Ajala (Jim Brown)

© Johann Persson, Sope Dirisu (Cassius Clay), David Ajala (Jim Brown)

Music can move mountains, although for Malcolm X it wasn’t moving fast enough. In Kemp Powers pulsating, extraordinarily topical account of four African-American legends meeting one night in a hotel room in Miami, the Black Power activist was calling out Sam Cooke, the singer-songwriter, later dubbed the `King of Soul’, for not putting his God-given gifts sufficiently at the service of `the movement’ for Civil Rights. Continue reading