Tag Archives: Lorraine Hansberry

The Fall

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Upstairs, London (****)

© Oscar O'Ryan, Ameera Conrad, Back: Cleo Raatus, Oarabile Ditsele, Thando Mangcu, Tankiso Mamabolo, Sizwesandile Mnisi

© Oscar O’Ryan, Ameera Conrad, Back: Cleo Raatus, Oarabile Ditsele, Thando Mangcu, Tankiso Mamabolo, Sizwesandile Mnisi

Sometimes a production just knocks you for six. This must have happened for many people when The Fall first appeared in the UK at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe festival. The story of the South African student movement for decolonisation, the #RhodesMustFall Movement, written and devised by those involved is a lesson to us all, in politicisation, finding one’s voice, discrimination and much more besides. Continue reading

They Drink It In The Congo

Almeida Theatre, London (***)

© Marc Brenner, (centre), Sule Rimi (Oudry) and cast

© Marc Brenner, (centre), Sule Rimi (Oudry) and cast

Adam Brace’s Stovepipe, about the `reconstruction’ of Iraq after the war, was one of the highlights of 2009. Brace, a former journalist, wove a compelling picture of characters drawn to `theatres’ of war, the dirt, the dust and the human mess of it all. I loved Michael Longhurst’s promenade production, too, and his subsequent work with Nick Payne’s Constellations, Linda and Remembrance Day all at the Royal Court. Continue reading

Pigs and Dogs

Royal Court Jerwood Theatre Downstairs (***/1/2)

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

© Helen Murray, Alex Hassell, Sharon D Clarke, Fisayo Akinade

They’re getting shorter and shorter, in fact Caryl Churchill’s Pigs & Dogs runs just 15 minutes, even more condensed than her controversial Seven Jewish Children. Continue reading

Les Blancs

Olivier, National Theatre, London (*****)

© Johan Persson, Danny Sapani (Tshembe Matoseh) and Matriarch singers

© Johan Persson,
Danny Sapani (Tshembe Matoseh) and Matriarch singers

A landmark production in a National Theatre repertoire increasingly spreading its wings, Lorraine Hansberry’s rarely seen Les Blancs is more incendiary even than her A Raisin in the Sun, now regarded as an American classic, but radically breaking the mould despite its Broadway success. Continue reading