Tag Archives: Paul Miller

Poison

Orange Tree Theatre, London ****

© The Other Richard, Zubin Varla and Claire Price - reaching some kind of resolution...

© The Other Richard, Zubin Varla and Claire Price – reaching some kind of resolution…

Letting go of grief. There are many ways and sometimes none will do. It must be the most difficult thing in the world to lose a child. From what I’ve learnt from friends, that feeling of loss never goes. Continue reading

French Without Tears

Orange Tree Theatre, London (****)

© The Other Richard, Joe Eyre (Kit), Florence Roberts (Diana Lake), Ziggy Heath (Alan)

© The Other Richard, Joe Eyre (Kit), Florence Roberts (Diana Lake), Ziggy Heath (Alan)

Boys will be boys – and in Terence Rattigan’s French Without Tears (1936), women are seen as okay if they were more or less surrogate fellas. Anything more extravagant and they are quickly deemed `femmes fatales’. Continue reading

The Philanderer

Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond, London (***)

© Richard Davenport, Dorothea Myer-Bennett (Julia Craven), Rupert Young (Leonard Charteris)

© Richard Davenport, Dorothea Myer-Bennett (Julia Craven), Rupert Young (Leonard Charteris)

Like a limbering up for Man and Superman written a decade later, George Bernard Shaw’s The Philanderer is a slightly watered down version of the later play with GBS at his most pugnaciously playful yet more than a little irritating, for all his `enlightened’ views. Continue reading

Each His Own Wilderness

Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond

© Richard Hubert Smith

© Richard Hubert Smith

Well, here’s a marvellous rediscovery. A rare play by prize winning author, Doris Lessing who died in 2014. Each His Own Wilderness had a staged reading at the Royal Court in 1958 but Paul Miller now running the Orange Tree with commendable bravura and flair (despite having his Arts Council funding completely cut on his first day in charge) has provided Lessing’s extraordinary play with its first full production. Continue reading

The Royale/Play Mas

Orange Tree Theatre/Bush Theatre, London

© Helen Murray

© Helen Murray

Two plays about the black community, one a revival set in Trinidad in the 1950s, one even earlier, set in the US in the early part of the 20th century. Both have plenty to tell us about the communities from which they’ve sprung and both, coincidentally, about the current state of arts funding in this country. Continue reading